Tag Archive: Zagreb


Works of Croatian female artists from the late 19th to the 21st Century (February 6th – April, 14, 2020)

The Art Pavilion in Zagreb is starting its exhibition season with the show Zagreb, City of female Artists. The exhibition is being specially put on to mark the Croatian Presidency of the Council of the European Union, and also in honor of Zagreb, capital of the Republic of Croatia, from which the Government of the Republic of Croatia will preside over the Council of the European Union. 

The basic idea of the exhibition is to provide a historical and critical cross-section from the oeuvres of those women visual artists who worked and left a record of themselves in the cultural life of the city of Zagreb in a period stretching from the end of the 19th century to the present age.

Within this relatively wide span of time, the generations of women artists are presented in three large, historically logical units The first covers the generations that were at work up to World War II; the second, those generations who started their exhibition activity after World War II and produced the major part of their work in the following decades; the third unit comprises the generations who appeared on the scene in the early seventies and later, and are, most of them, still at work.

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The exhibition covers a hundred works: the paintings, sculptures, video performances, audio and video installations of the most significant women artists from the end of the 19th century, starting with Anka Bestall, Slava Raškaj, Lina Crnčić Virant, Nasta Rojc, Mila Wod, Sonja Kovačić-Tajčević, Anka Krizmanić, Vera Nikolić Podrinska and Zdenka Ostović Pexidr Srića; it go on with Nevenka Đorđević, Ksenija Kantoci, Marta Ehrlich, Mila Kumbatović, Melita Bošnjak, Miranda Morić, Milena Lah, Vera Josipović, Vesna Sokolić, Borka Avramova, Vera Fischer, Vera Dajht Kralj, Tonka Petrić, Biserka Baretić, Marija Ujević, Ljerka Šibenik, Goranka Vrus Murtić, Nives Kavurić Kurtović, Zdenka Pozaić, Edita Schubert, Marijana Muljević, Sanja Iveković, Jadranka Fatur, Nevenka Arbanas, Vesna Popržan, Breda Beban, Nina Ivančić, Zvjezdana Fio and Dubravka Rakoci, continuing with Vlasta Delimar, Vesna Pokas, Kata Mijatović, Amela Frankl, Ksenija Turčić, Mirjana Vodopija, Vlasta Žanić, Kristina Leko, Božena Končić Badurina, Magdalena Pederin, Nika Radić, Ivana Franke, Martina Mezak, Ana Hušman and Andreja Kulunčić with the women’s collective ISTE (EQUALS ).

Source: https://www.umjetnicki-paviljon.hr/en/portfolios/works-of-croatian-women-artists-from-the-end-of-the-19th-to-the-21st-century/

MV

Ivan Kozaric by Luka Mjeda, '98 (MSU, photo MV)Ivan Kožarić’s exhibition “Freedom Is a Rare Bird” will be opened on June 21 at Haus der Kunst in Munich as a collaborative project with the Museum of Contemporary Art Zagreb, Croatia. (Pictures from the Museum of Contemporary Art (by MV))

“Why to live if not freely” says the author and writes the motto on the wall of the Croatian MSU museum as well. “I’m not an artist but I am, nevertheless, a bad sculptor. Through my search, I came to the point where I can say that I am on the trail to discover art, and I am content with that.” (Ivan Kožarić)

Ivan Kožarić (born in 1921 in Petrinja, lives and works in Zagreb) completed his studies at the Academy of Fine Arts in Zagreb in the late 1940s. He has since become one of the most influential postwar avant-garde artists in what was once Yugoslavia. “Freedom is a Rare Bird” represents six decades of his complex artistic oeuvre and is the most comprehensive survey exhibition to date to be devoted to the sculptor outside of his native Croatia.

Kožarić has always kept the character of his works open. He reworks earlier pieces, reprocesses earlier ideas, and intentionally dates works inaccurately or incorrectly. To do justice to this openness, the exhibition is organized according to thematic connections within his work, rather than to chronology, style, or development.

Source:

culturenet

MV

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